Warndu Mai's wallaby shanks recipe - The Guardian

Wallaby has a stronger flavour than kangaroo but both are a hearty dish – or swap for lamb shanks.

Warndu Wallaby Shanks - Make sure you source meat from ethical harvesters. Photograph: Luisa Brimble/Hachette Australia

Warndu Wallaby Shanks - Make sure you source meat from ethical harvesters. Photograph: Luisa Brimble/Hachette Australia

This recipe can be made using kangaroo or wallaby shanks; both are equally delicious. Wallaby has a stronger gamey flavour than kangaroo and the best place to get it is the ethical harvesters at Flinders Island Meats.

Wallaby shanks

serves 4

4 wallaby shanks
1 tbsp plain flour
drizzle of olive oil
1/2 onion or 2 shallots, finely diced 
2 garlic cloves
1 celery stalk
1 carrot 
400 g tinned tomatoes
500 ml kangaroo or beef stock
1/4 cup red wine
2 tbsp ground bush tomato 
1 tsp native thyme, fresh and picked, or half the amount dried and ground
2 sprigs of sea rosemary
1 tsp ground pepperberries
2 large sprigs of fresh saltbush, chopped 
mashed potato, to serve
sea parsley, for garnish

Note: If not using wallaby or roo, this recipe works for lamb too.

Wash and pat-dry the shanks, then coat in flour. Heat a large, heavy-based pot with lid over high heat. Brown the shanks on all sides. Remove from the pot and set aside.

Add the oil, onion, garlic, celery and carrot to the pot. Cook until soft. Add the tomatoes, stock, wine and all the spices, except the sea parsley.

Put the shanks and any meat juices back in the pot, bring to the boil over high heat, then reduce to a simmer. Put the lid on and cook for 1 1/2 – 2 hours, or until the shanks fall from the bone. Serve with mash and a sea parsley garnish.

Warndu Mai (Good Food) by Rebecca Sullivan and Damien Coulthard (Hachette Australia, $45). Photograph: Hachette Australia

Warndu Mai (Good Food) by Rebecca Sullivan and Damien Coulthard (Hachette Australia, $45). Photograph: Hachette Australia

Check our resources guide for some useful places to buy from, ask your local supermarket to stock some, forage for a little (respectfully) and, better yet, grow a little too. Whether it’s a balcony or a backyard, growing herbs and greens is easier than you think.

  • This is an edited extract from Warndu Mai (Good Food) by Rebecca Sullivan and Damien Coulthard (Hachette Australia, $45). Next week, saltbush & muntrie soda bread with Davidson’s plum & cinnamon myrtle jam.